Claiming Your Statutory Share

Were you disinherited by (one of) your parents? As a child you are always entitled to your legal share. 

Partiar is happy to discuss your options in this.

FREE CONSULTATION

Claiming Your Statutory Share

Were you disinherited by (one of) your parents? As a child you are always entitled to your legal share. 

Partiar is happy to discuss your options in this.

REQUEST A FREE CONSULTATION

You were disinherited as a child, what to do?

A parent can decide per will to disinherit you as a child. Yet you are still entitled to a certain part of the inheritance, your statutory share. A statutory share is half of the common inheritance and only entitles to a monetary claim. So items such as a watch or a certain piece of jewelry are excluded.

Claim a legitimate portion of inheritance

Need help?

Claiming and getting the rightful share is often a complicated matter. Often there has been no contact with the parents for quite some time and that the death of a parent is often discovered after some time.
Do you have questions about claiming your statutory share or could you use help in this? Please contact us for a free consultation. This meeting can take place at your home, anywhere in the Netherlands, or at our office. 

REQUEST A FREE CONSULTATION
How do you claim your statutory share?

How do you claim your statutory share?

You will not automatically receive your legal share, you have to claim it within 5 years from the heirs or the executor, if he of she is named in the will.

The term of 5 years is a legal and absolute term. After this period has expired, you can no longer appeal to statutory share.

Due date of your statutory share

You can only get your statutory share paid after the death of the surviving spouse or registered partner. This also applies if your father or mother had a cohabitation agreement.

In addition, a statutory share cannot be claimed immediately after the testators death. This is initially a period of 6 months.

Who Claim Legitimate Portion of Inheritance Gives You Power of Attorney in Your Living Will?